Welsh rates of Income Tax

Source: National Assembly for Wales | | 23/01/2019

The Welsh Government has confirmed that the proposed Welsh Government Budget has been ratified and that the new Welsh rates of Income Tax (WRIT) will be set at 10p for 2019-20. This means that the rates of Income Tax paid by Welsh taxpayers will continue to be the same as those paid by English and Northern Irish taxpayers when the WRIT is introduced.

The WRIT will be payable on the non-savings and non-dividend income of those defined as Welsh taxpayers and WRIT taxpayers will receive a new tax code, starting with C for Cymru. Revenue from the Welsh rates of Income Tax will go to the Welsh Government.

To effect this change the UK government will reduce each of the 3 rates of Income Tax – basic, higher and additional rate – paid by Welsh taxpayers by 10p from next April. Each year, the Welsh Government will then decide the 3 Welsh rates of Income Tax (the Welsh basic rate; the Welsh higher rate; and the Welsh additional rate), which will be added to the reduced UK rates. The combination of reduced UK rates plus the Welsh rates determines the overall rate of Income Tax paid by Welsh taxpayers. The WRIT will be administered by HMRC on behalf of the Welsh Government.

Clarification of who is a Welsh taxpayer:

The definition of a Welsh taxpayer is generally decided by where a taxpayer lives. If the taxpayer has one place of residence or a main residence in Wales, then they will be defined as a Welsh taxpayer.



 

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